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turbanista:

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

turbanista:

A Soninke woman paints the wall of her house in Djajibine, Mauritania
Photo by Margaret Courtney-Clarke

(via theafricatheynevershowyou)

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lettersandlight:

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Tomorrow’s stories start in all sorts of places: on the drive to work, or at the movie theater. One constant source of inspiration? The classrooms that tackle NaNoWriMo through our Young Writers Program. YWP educator Daniel Stone shares about the magical experience of writing a novel…

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beautiesofafrique:

Happy Independence day to the Republic of Congo

Celebrating 54 years of Independence from France

15th August 1960 (15/08/1960)

(via theafricatheynevershowyou)

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theafricatheynevershowyou:

fepounet:

Portraits by Jimmy Nelson

Samburu, Kenya

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thisisfusion:

It’s been a year since teenager Israel Hernandez died while in police custody.

His death sparked a riotous debate over whether police should be allowed to use Tasers, and whether the devices can actually be considered non-lethal. Fusion investigated the circumstances surrounding Hernandez’s…

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What’s up with “could of” and “could have”?

theyuniversity:

Undoubtedly, whenever teachers and editors see “could of,” “should of,” and “would of,” they have the following reactions:

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"Could of,” “should of,” and “would of,” are all incorrect. Very, very incorrect.

These are correct:

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We left something out, didn’t we? “Might of.”

That’s because “might of" isn’t always wrong, e.g., "The might of Zeus is seemingly greater than that of Krillin.”

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Of course, in a sentence such as “I might of won the trophy if I had practiced harder,” “might of” is absolutely wrong. It should be “might have" (or "might’ve").

If you make these mistakes often, an easy way to avoid them is to always use “could have,” “should have,” “would have,” and “might have”—instead of using their contractions. After all, many teachers and editors frown upon the use of contractions anyway.

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Ever finished a book? I mean, truly finished one? Cover to cover. Closed the spine with that slow awakening that comes with reentering consciousness?

You take a breath, deep from the bottom of your lungs and sit there. Book in both hands, your head staring down at the cover, back page or wall in front of you.

You’re grateful, thoughtful, pensive. You feel like a piece of you was just gained and lost. You’ve just experienced something deep, something intimate… Full from the experience, the connection, the richness that comes after digesting another soul.

[…]

It’s no surprise that readers are better people. Having experienced someone else’s life through abstract eyes, they’ve learned what it’s like to leave their bodies and see the world through other frames of reference. They have access to hundreds of souls, and the collected wisdom of all them.

"

Beautiful read on why readers are, “scientifically,” the best people to date

Perhaps Kafka’s timeless contention that books are "the axe for the frozen sea inside us" applies equally to the frozen sea between us. 

(via explore-blog)

neil will love this one.

(via amandapalmer)

(Source: explore-blog, via amandapalmer)

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What’s up with comma splices?

theyuniversity:

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A comma splice is a grammar error that is created by joining two independent clauses (complete sentences) with a comma. It is one of the most common grammar mistakes; if you pay attention, you’ll encounter dozens of them each day.

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Since we have two complete sentences, we would form a comma splice if we combined them by using just a comma:

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We see comma splices everywhere, and it’s unfortunate that people don’t know how to correct them.

Here is an easy way to correct a comma splice:

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There is another way to fix comma splices: use the “FANBOYS”:

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IMPORTANT NOTE: If the sentences are short, the comma before each FANBOYS is optional. However, on the SAT and ACT exams, they ALWAYS require a comma.

The technical name for the FANBOYS is coordinating conjunction. The term itself isn’t important; what actually matters is the role that coordinating conjunctions play. So let’s take a random comma splice and fix it by using one of the FANBOYS:

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The sentence is now correct. On standardized tests, comma splices are quite common. Placing one of the FANBOYS between the two independent clauses (i.e., complete sentences) solves this problem. Just be sure to pick the one that makes the most logical sense. (For instance, there is a big difference between “but” and “and,” so you have to pick the right word.)

Good luck on the SAT!

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